Esther 4:7, Question 3. Why does the verse emphasize that Haman promised money to the treasuries?

  • Rav Hirsch (Collected Writings, Volume II, 404) writes that Mordechai mentions that Haman promised money to the treasuries to emphasize to Esther that, even though Achashverosh refused Haman’s bribe, Achashverosh still had a low character. This is clear from the very fact that Haman felt comfortable enough to even make such an offer, expecting Achashverosh to take it.
  • On the level of drush, hint, R’ Avraham of Slonim notes that this verse alludes to the idea that each and every Jew is treasured before their Creator. He derives this hint from the fact that following the words “ginzei hamelech,” (“the king’s treasuries”), is the word “Yehudim.” In other words, the most precious object in the treasuries of the King of kings are the Yehudim.
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Esther 2:15, Question 6. Why does the verse repeat (see 2:9) that Esther found favor/grace in the eyes of others?

  • The Midrash (Esther Rabbah 6:9) suggests a number of reasons for this verse’s repeating Esther’s description. One opinion (that of R’ Yuda) is that people considered Esther an icon (work of art representing a person) and was liked by all.
  • Another opinion (R’ Nechemya’s) agrees that, in comparison to other women, Esther was the most beautiful.
  • However, the Rabbis there say that Esther found favor in the eyes of the “upper ones and the lower ones.” In other words, she was liked by angels and men, as it says in Mishlei (3:4) “be’eyney elohim v’adam” (“in the eyes of angels and men”). Torah Temimah explains that people care about appearances, but angels care about character. They saw in Esther that she was gentle and had a pure character. We can perhaps add that there are people who become beautiful through their beautiful characteristics.
  • The Talmud (Megillah 7a and 13a) says people found a kinship with Esther because she looked as though she could belong to any nation. Ben Yehoyada says the reason for this was miraculous, and its purpose was in order for people to not be able to know that this girl raised in Mordechai’s house was of a particular group – namely, Jewish. Although some want to assert that Esther’s green color (as we’ve mentioned before) may have been a beautiful, olive complexion, this favorable view is not the way the Talmud (Megillah 15a) understands Esther’s color. Her being green effectively removed her from the Talmud’s list there of the four most beautiful women in history. The Vilna Gaon wonders why the Talmud could suggest that Esther was pallid and green if the verse (2:7) itself testifies to her beauty. He answers that Esther was indeed beautiful at one point, but turned pale from sadness having to endure Achashverosh’s harem.
  • The Pri Tzedek writes in his commentary on Shemos that there are different levels of love, with “chein” (“favor”) meaning a love without reason, and that is the appreciation Esther received from the people around her.

Esther 2:15, Question 2. Why does this verse mention Esther’s father’s name, one of two times (the other in 9:29) in the entire Megillas Esther?

  • The Malbim contends that Esther, besides possessing health and beauty, also had great character because of her distinguished father. We know that he was a great man because it says in the Talmud (hinted at in Megillah 10b) that all prophets must have good genealogy.
  • Another reason for her father to be mentioned here comes from the Maharal. He quotes the verse in the Torah (Bireishis 2:24) that says a man who finds his intended should cling to her. Maharal continues that a woman, too, clings to her husband after marriage. Therefore, Esther was connected to Mordechai up until this point, and will now have to cling to her new “husband,” Achashverosh.
  • The Talmud (Megillah 13b) says that Esther’s ancestors Rachel, Benyamin, and Shaul were all able to keep secrets. This characteristic was passed down through Avichayil to Esther. Rav Chaim Kanievsky says this verse emphasizes this genetic link to secrecy. This is why Esther’s father was not mentioned earlier when her secrecy was first mentioned (2:10 above), because there, she was commanded to be secretive by Mordechai, and this verse is attesting to her innate ability to do so for this long period of time.