Esther 9:3, Question 1. To what does the phrase “that is the king’s” refer?

ג וְכָלשָׂרֵי הַמְּדִינוֹת וְהָאֲחַשְׁדַּרְפְּנִים וְהַפַּחוֹת וְעֹשֵׂי הַמְּלָאכָה אֲשֶׁר לַמֶּלֶךְ מְנַשְּׂאִים אֶתהַיְּהוּדִים כִּינָפַל פַּחַדמָרְדֳּכַי עֲלֵיהֶם

3. And all of the officers of the states and governor and lesser (governors) and the doers of the work of the king supported/honored the Yehudim because the fear of Mordechai fell on them.

  • Rashi explains that the officers “that are the king’s” are those who serve the needs of the king.
  • As Avigdor Bonchek points out, the verse is demonstrating that fulfilling the king’s needs is not only the job of these servants, but their very title and identity is in their attendance to their responsibilities.

Esther 2:18, Question 3. Why does Achashverosh do all three of these actions?

The Talmud (Megillah 13a) says that Achashverosh made a party, and yet Esther did not reveal her identity. He then relaxed the taxes, and Esther did not reveal her identity. He finally gave her gifts, and she still did not reveal her identity. The Me’am Loez and the Malbim point out that these were meant to work psychologically. The first tactic was meant to show how loving he was. The second trick as to emphasize her generosity. The third tactic was meant to show, through his generosity to all the nations, how much more-so he would reward generously whichever nation from which Esther hails.

Esther 2:11, Question 4. Why does the verse use the phrase “done with her” instead of “done to her?”

  • Rashi says that the verse uses the phrase “done with her” instead of “done to her” because Mordechai knew Esther was in her current situation for a great reason beyond his own surmise. Mordechai was therefore watching to see how Esther was being used by H-Shem. How is she to be an instrument for something great? To put this in perspective, we all believe Moshiach is coming, but we still want to see how it will come to be.
  • The Ohel Moshe asks if this is not a contradiction to a previous comment of Rashi’s (on Esther 2:10) where he says that Esther’s revealing her Jewish identity would get her dismissed from the contest. If so, how could Mordechai have expected any good to come from Esther’s being in the king’s harem? The Ohel Moshe answers that one cannot push aside a single Halacha, even to save the Jewish people. He quotes Rav Moshe Feinstein that one must do whatever is within one’s power to avoid a sin, even if one knows that the sin would bring about the rescue of the Jews.