Esther 5:1, Question 3. Why does the verse mention so many locations?

  • Both the Vilna Gaon and Malbim write that the verse mentions so many locations because Esther stood outside his private residence, where Achashverosh was expected to be. H-Shem had arranged it so that Achashverosh was then in court, able to see Esther outside his residence. This way, she was suddenly in the public courtyard, and he felt unable to order her execution. Like the reasons he had to give him pause before having Vashti killed, the king again did not want to appear insecure, especially since this would be the second wife he’d have executed.
  • As the Alshich points out, since Esther was right in front of Achashverosh, nobody would be able to attack her without his say-so.
  • Finally, the Imrei Emes, in a less literal interpretation of the verse, writes that the verse’s description of Esther’s location is a spiritual dimension. This is not a physical courtyard. Rather, the added power of Esther’s accomplished Ruach HaKodesh, her powerful prayer, and her self-sacrifice transported Esther into H-Shem’s Inner Courtyard, where He made Himself more receptive to her plea.

Esther 2:22, Question 6. Why does Esther report the information in Mordechai’s name?

This verse is quoted throughout Rabbinic literature – including the Talmud (Chulin 104b), the Mishnah (Avos 6:6), and Tanna D’vei Eliyahu – as proof of the importance of quoting one’s sources. It says, “one who says a thing in the name of the speaker brings redemption to the world.” This is not mere intellectual honesty, and there must be a deeper relationship between quoting in a speaker’s name and redeeming the world.

  • The Imrei Emes writes that when you give Torah, you get Torah back. When you teach in somebody else’s name, you receive that person’s Torah in return.
  • Rav Shimon Schwab quotes the Talmud (Yevamos 97a) that when you quote the words of a Torah scholar, his lips move in the grave. This leads to redemption because, as the Midrash (Bireishis Rabbah 98) says, when two people say the same thing, that is the end of argument. Symbolically, when you and that scholar are saying the same thing, that is the definition of the end to argument. As class participant CL pointed out, disunity destroyed the Beis HaMikdash, and it shall be rebuilt (speedily, in our time) through the unity Jews gain from sharing in the Torah of those who came before us.
  • The Maharal in Derech Chaim points out that the root of an original thought comes from the soul of the person saying it. By repeating somebody else’s original thought, you are replanting the root back from where it came. That, too, is redemption because the definition of redemption is putting things back to their ideal state.
  • In Pachad Yitzchak, Rav Yitzchak Hutner quotes the Talmud’s (Brachos 17a) prayer that we want to do H-Shem’s Will, but exile restrains us. Rav Hutner continues that, on a personal level, exile means when a soul cannot grow and feels restrained. Therefore, redemption is bringing action back into the soul’s potential. By reporting Mordechai’s words – which are all Torah – Esther brings about the redemption of the Purim story, and eventually leads to the building of the Second Temple.