Esther 9:32, Question 5. Why is this document called a book?

  • From this verse’s calling this document a book, the Talmud (Megilla 19a) learns that a Megillas Esther scroll needs to be sewn without flax to be used in fulfillment of the mitzva of its public reading on Purim.
  • Based on this, Malbim stresses that the verse’s use of the word, sefer (“book”) indicates that the Sages agreed with Esther, and allowed this story into TaNaCh.
  • R’ Moshe Dovid Valle notes that the word, maamar (“statement”) implies its source is from Above, like a saying of the Most High. Furthermore, sefer (60+80+200=340) has the same gematria as Shem (“Name”) (300+40=340) because the Shechina agreed that this belonged in the Holy Torah, with its story and lessons always relevant – even after the return of the Shechina to Her place with the coming of Mashiach, bimheira biyameinu.

Esther 9:29, Question 1. Why is the letter tuf written large in the word vatich’tov (“and she wrote”)?

29. And Esther the Queen, daughter of Avichayil, and Mordechai the Yehudi wrote all of the authority to accept this second letter of Purim.

  • Bechiras Avraham and the Me’am Loez quote the Talmud (Yoma 29a) that, in some sense, the Purim story is the last open miracle in Jewish history recorded in TaNaCh. Therefore, this letter tuf, being the final letter in the Hebrew alphabet, is written large to hint to this idea of the end of miracles.
  • But will not miracles happen again, as promised by our prophet when he writes (Micha 7:15) that H-Shem will show the Jewish people wondrous things, “as in the days of [our] coming out of Egypt?” The Beis HaLevi answers that the miracles we experience today are fleeting, like a person lifting a candle against the driving wind. The prophet’s words are regarding the days of Mashiach (bim’heira biyameinu), at which time miracles will be made to last forever.
  • R’ Moshe Dovid Valle writes that the large tuf testifies to Esther’s purity (temimus). He writes that this is the reason why the verse also mentions that Mordechai is a Yehudi.

Esther 2:16, Question 3. Why does the verse mention both the number and name of the month?

  • The Talmud (Rosh HaShanah 7a) uses this verse to suggest we usually count the years from Rosh HaShanah every Tishrei, but we count the individual months from Nissan. The names of the months we use are not even Jewish in origin (Yerushalmi, Rosh HaShanah 1:2), so why do we use them? By mentioning the names, Ramban writes (on Shemos 12:2) we remind ourselves that we are in exile, still awaiting Mashiach, speedily in our day.
  • The Talmud (Megillah 13a) says that Achashverosh and Esther met in this month because Teves is a naturally colder month, and the warmth of bodies would be more enjoyable. This way, Achashverosh would be naturally predisposed to like Esther more than the other women. In this seemingly “natural” manner, H-Shem works His miracles.